Can someone please give me advice on house training my dog?

.

I recently took in my boy friends 6month old bassinet hound puppy. My boyfriend did not do a good job of trying to house train the puppy, he would just feed him and put him outside in his back yard until it was time to bring him in at night and than put him in a crate. Since my boyfriend had to relocate to another state on business I now have the responsibility of house training the puppy. I use the crate, I have used the puppy pads, I have tried walking him everyday until he does his business and he will still go in his crate no matter how many times I take him outside to go. I thought dogs don’t like to have there spoils in their den?
I am slowly losing my patients; I really want to keep the puppy he is so cute and fun to play with. Someone please help.

Other Dog Kennel Accessories Sites of Interest




8 Responses to “Can someone please give me advice on house training my dog?”

  1. Helen B says:

    The golden rule is when your pup goes to sleep, immediately he wakes up put him straight outside and stay with him until he has a wee then praise him and tell him what a good boy he is. This also applies to after he has had anything to eat he must go out preferably with you, so you can make a fuss of him. How quickly your dog is trained is determined by how much you put into the training.
    Papers by the door with the smell of his urine on it and encourage to always go in the same place. (whilst he is unable to hold the urine for a long time) When succeeds in holding on then you will then put the papers outside when he has got the idea of using the paper. He then should start ging to the door and if he does not bark then you should be aware he is trying to tell you he wants to go ot..

    The crate is being used incorrectly in my opinion. I have crated smaller dogs but they need a bed at one end and paper at the other. They do not get told off if they use the paper in the crate. My Crates are not prisons in fact the dogs have their food in them and go to bed in them but the doors are never locked.
    Feeding them in the crate will also discourage messing in the crate, but again the door is not closed. This has to be the safe place for your dog.
    Best of luck – it can be quite fun you know
    Helen

  2. Shelly says:

    Like the other person said, keep them in a small area. Just enough for them to turn around in. I only crate trained my Jacob. The rest of the animals we just kept them confined to a very small space. My mom would make take them out every 30 minutes even though I didn’t think they would they would need to go that often but now that I am an adult with my own. I do recommend taking them out as much as possible (so guess my mother was right after all :)).

    Lots of praise when they potty outside and possible treats.

  3. madison says:

    just like the other person said . The crate needs to be big enough the puppy to turn around and stand up in but also small enough were if they were to poop or pee they wouldnt want to have to be next to it. Before putting him in the crate take him out to potty . Try puting his favorite toy in his crate and giving him treats . He should learn that when he needs to go potty to give you a sign so you could take him out to do his buisness . Its going to take some time but dont give up and be patient

  4. snicker says:

    He is still a very small puppy and yes the crate is probably way to large. Also, you must take him out every 2 hrs on his lead and if he does not "go" in 5-10 minutes take him back into his crate. Scolding him will not help he has no clue what your problem is and does not understand what you are saying. All he knows is u are upset at him and this stresses him greatly. make sure that his crate has nice comfy towels or blankets in it all over the bottom of the crate. This is for his comfort but also because that is what he will associate as off limits for potty. Take him out after play sessions and 15 minutes after he eats or drinks then back into the crate. It will work if the crate is small enough and you are determined that it will work.
    Another thing is that he may have decided that your friend was the head dog and has not learned that you are the boss now.
    Please make sure he does not have to hold his potty for very long . Puppies have very small bladders.

  5. Romeo says:

    This is now a habit for the dog, not a choice. You need to buy a spray that is specifically made to eliminate the smell of urine and poo, sold at most pet stores and Walmart. It smells like vanilla, which alleviates and cleanses any smell of urine and poo. Dogs will continue to go to the bathroom where they smell urine or poo. The other thing is he may need to be set on a schedule, allow him 30 minutes to eat, then lift the bowl up, no more food.. then let him out, leave him out until he goes. Dogs need to be let out quite a few times a day when they are puppies. You will have to clean the crate with the cleaner everyday while he is still using it as his bathroom. Good luck

  6. jay_man33 says:

    Congrats on stepping up! It’s not easy…trust me… I’m on my 2nd pup now 🙂

    Starting with the crate: make sure that the pup only has enough room to stand and turn around – mainly for comfort. If the dog has too much room he’ll defecate in the crate.

    You’ll need to supervise this dog whenever he’s out of the crate, if you catch him sniffing around or notice him about to relieve himself, immediately take him outside to his predetermined bathroom.

    Try not to use walks as bathroom time, they only make it inconvenient for you – a walk is a great source of exercise and training.

    Lastly, consistency is the word – I’m sure you’ve heard a lot of it. It’s a shame he’s already 2. There are a lot of bad habits you’ll have to break. It will take a lot of time, effort, and consistency to break those habits. But I promise they’ll be worth it when you see the look on your boyfriend’s face once he sees how well you’ve trained your dog.

    Keep in touch – hope I can help!

  7. Talltail says:

    He probably doesn’t see the crate as a den. Dog crates need to be big enough to stand up in and turn around in. Any bigger, and it’s a playpen. How long is he in his crate for? Maybe he can’t hold is bladder long enough.

  8. Cadsuane says:

    A puppy do not have great bladder control, as such it needs to go often, the best way to learn is through experience, take the dog out often, and always after it has eaten, slept or played. If it does go outside, make a huge fuzz how its such a good girl/boy, and alternativly also give it a treat. It will associate that when it comes outside it pleases you and get a reward through your attention or a treat.

    Broods generaly have a need to go more often then males, also a good place to keep the dog when you cant pay attention is either a own designated area with newspaper, or a crate (dogs will rarely want to go where they are to sleep), crates are great sleeping places where the dog can feel it has a "own room" and it also means it feels safe in the crate for when you need to travel.

    When the accident happen, take the dog out imidiatly, dont yell at it, it’s just a baby and if you didnt take it outside its not its fault it couldnt keep it anymore. Make sure to wash up well after the accident, dont use amoniak cleaners these just intensify smell, and if a spot smell like a toilet it will be used acordingly.

    If you have other dogs then in general puppies can learn a great lot from them, potty training do take a lot of patience though (and consistancy is always the key in any dog training), if you have specific rooms with sensitive floors or whatnot, then limit the access here by shuting the door to these rooms so the puppy cant go there.

    If months pass without it helping, then contact a vet to make sure the dog dont have a medical condition, if it passes the health check its time for a behaviouralist, sometimes the dog has another problem based on irrational fears, or bad experiences you may not even be aware of in its past that will cause it to not want to go outside.

Copyright © 2011 Dog Kennel Accessories. All Rights Reserved. Contact Us | Terms of Use | About | Privacy Statement | Site Map